Acerca de Anarquismo en PDF [es]

Anarquismo en PDF es un proyecto que busca construir y difundir un archivo-biblioteca omnilingue con todo el material digital anarquista existente mediante el intercambio activo y desinteresado de forma horizontal, además de traducir, revisar y mejorar textos disponibles.

Como organización buscamos la consecución de la Anarquía, apoyando por ello causas y creando lazos con diferentes editoriales, colectivos y resto de organizaciones a las cuales ofrecemos nuestros espacios, recursos y solidaridad.

El proyecto se articula en torno al anarquismo y la cultura, y está abierto a cualquier persona que quiera participar (de manera puntual o permanente) si comparte esos objetivos y formas.

Estamos en contra de los derechos de propiedad intelectual por ser un impedimento de la sociedad horizontal que deseamos y por la que luchamos. Además nuestros textos son editados en lenguaje neutro. Piratea, difunde y apoya la cultura, a las autoras y editoriales anarquistas.

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Acerca de Anarquismo en PDF [es]

Anarquismo en PDF es un proyecto que busca construir y difundir un archivo-biblioteca omnilingue con todo el material digital anarquista existente mediante el intercambio activo y desinteresado de forma horizontal, además de traducir, revisar y mejorar textos disponibles.

Como organización buscamos la consecución de la Anarquía, apoyando por ello causas y creando lazos con diferentes editoriales, colectivos y resto de organizaciones a las cuales ofrecemos nuestros espacios, recursos y solidaridad.

El proyecto se articula en torno al anarquismo y la cultura, y está abierto a cualquier persona que quiera participar (de manera puntual o permanente) si comparte esos objetivos y formas.

Estamos en contra de los derechos de propiedad intelectual por ser un impedimento de la sociedad horizontal que deseamos y por la que luchamos. Además nuestros textos son editados en lenguaje neutro. Piratea, difunde y apoya la cultura, a las autoras y editoriales anarquistas.

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Louise Michel fue probablemente la portavoz más conocida y popular del socialismo y del anarcosocialismo durante los años 80 y 90 del siglo XIX, hasta su muerte en 1905. A través de su actividad como oradora en inglés y francés llegó literalmente a cientos de miles de personas, iniciándolas en el socialismo. A su entierro acudió una inmensa cantidad de parisinos pobres y fue el segundo funeral más multitudinario en la historia de Francia hasta la fecha, superado solamente por el de Victor Hugo. Todavía hoy —ya que su visión del mundo a menudo parece demasiado melodramática para la mente moderna, y porque los historiadores socialistas con frecuencia se dejan impresionar más por estudios extensos sobre nimiedades teóricas que por las verdaderas relaciones con la población oprimida—, es prácticamente desconocida.

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An Anarchist FAQ — Section A [en]

Section A — What is anarchism?

Modern civilisation faces three potentially catastrophic crises:

  1. Social breakdown, a shorthand term for rising rates of poverty, homelessness, crime, violence, alienation, drug and alcohol abuse, social isolation, political apathy, dehumanisation, the deterioration of community structures of self-help and mutual aid, etc.;

  2. Destruction of the planet’s delicate ecosystems on which all complex forms of life depend; and

  3. The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, particularly nuclear weapons.

Orthodox opinion, including that of Establishment “experts,” mainstream media, and politicians, generally regards these crises as separable, each having its own causes and therefore capable of being dealt with on a piecemeal basis, in isolation from the other two. Obviously, however, this “orthodox” approach isn’t working, since the problems in question are getting worse. Unless some better approach is taken soon, we are clearly headed for disaster, either from catastrophic war, ecological Armageddon, or a descent into urban savagery — or all of the above.

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An Anarchist FAQ — Section B [en]

Section B — Why do anarchists oppose the current system?

This section of the FAQ presents an analysis of the basic social relationships of modern society and the structures which create them, particularly those aspects of society that anarchists want to change.

Anarchism is, essentially, a revolt against capitalism. As a political theory it was born at the same time as capitalism and in opposition to it. As a social movement it grew in strength and influence as capitalism colonised more and more parts of society. Rather than simply express opposition to the state, as some so-called experts assert, anarchism has always been opposed to other forms of authority and the oppression they create, in particular capitalism and its particular form of private property. It is no coincidence that Proudhon, the first person to declare themselves an anarchist, did so in a book entitled What is Property? (and gave the answer “It is theft!”). From Proudhon onwards, anarchism has opposed both the state and capitalism (indeed, it is the one thing such diverse thinkers as Benjamin Tucker and Peter Kropotkin both agreed on). Needless to say, since Proudhon anarchism has extended its critique of authority beyond these two social evils. Other forms of social hierarchy, such as sexism, racism and homophobia, have been rejected as limitations of freedom and equality. So this section of the FAQ summarises the key ideas behind anarchism’s rejection of the current system we live under.

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An Anarchist FAQ — Section C [en]

Section C — What are the myths of capitalist economics?

Within capitalism, economics plays an important ideological role. Economics has been used to construct a theory from which exploitation and oppression are excluded, by definition. We will attempt here to explain why capitalism is deeply exploitative. Elsewhere, in section B, we have indicated why capitalism is oppressive and will not repeat ourselves here.

In many ways economics plays the role within capitalism that religion played in the Middle Ages, namely to provide justification for the dominant social system and hierarchies. “The priest keeps you docile and subjected”, argued Malatesta, “telling you everything is God’s will; the economist says it’s the law of nature.” They “end up saying that no one is responsible for poverty, so there’s no point rebelling against it.” [Fra Contadini, p. 21] Even worse, they usually argue that collective action by working-class people is counterproductive and, like the priest, urge us to tolerate current oppression and exploitation with promises of a better future (in heaven for the priest, for the economist it is an unspecified “long run”). It would be no generalisation to state that if you want to find someone to rationalise and justify an obvious injustice or form of oppression then you should turn to an economist (preferably a “free market” one).

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An Anarchist FAQ — Section D [en]

Section D — How do statism and capitalism affect society?

This section of the FAQ indicates how both statism and capitalism affect the society they exist in. It is a continuation of sections B (Why do anarchists oppose the current system?) and C (What are the myths of capitalist economics?) and it discusses the impact of the underlying social and power relationships within the current system on society.

This section is important because the institutions and social relationships capitalism and statism spawn do not exist in a social vacuum, they have deep impacts on our everyday lives. These effects go beyond us as individuals (for example, the negative effects of hierarchy on our individuality) and have an effect on how the political institutions in our society work, how technology develops, how the media operates and so on. As such, it is worthwhile to point out how (and why) statism and capitalism affect society as a whole outwith the narrow bounds of politics and economics.

So here we sketch some of the impact concentrations of political and economic power have upon society. While many people attack the results of these processes (like specific forms of state intervention, ecological destruction, imperialism, etc.) they usually ignore their causes. This means that the struggle against social evils will be never-ending, like a doctor fighting the symptoms of a disease without treating the disease itself or the conditions which create it in the first place. We have indicated the roots of the problems we face in earlier sections; now we discuss how these impact on other aspects of our society. This section of the FAQ explores the interactions of the causes and results and draws out how the authoritarian and exploitative nature of capitalism and the state affects the world we live in.

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An Anarchist FAQ — Section E [en]

Section E — What do anarchists think causes ecological problems?

This section of the FAQ expands upon section D.4 (“What is the relationship between capitalism and the ecological crisis?”) in which we indicated that since capitalism is based upon the principle of “grow or die,” a “green” capitalism is impossible. By its very nature capitalism must expand, creating new markets, increasing production and consumption, and so invading more ecosystems, using more resources, and upsetting the interrelations and delicate balances that exist with ecosystems. We have decided to include a separate section on this to stress how important green issues are to anarchism and what a central place ecology has in modern anarchism.

Anarchists have been at the forefront of ecological thinking and the green movement for decades. This is unsurprising, as many key concepts of anarchism are also key concepts in ecological thought. In addition, the ecological implications of many anarchist ideas (such as decentralisation, integration of industry and agriculture, and so forth) has meant that anarchists have quickly recognised the importance of ecological movements and ideas.

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